MDMonday: MiniMed 670G Glucose Monitor and Insulin Pump for Pediatric Populations

 Image from http://www.medtronicdiabetes.com/

Image from http://www.medtronicdiabetes.com/

 

In September of 2017, FDA approved a device for patients with type 1 diabetes aged 14 and up. The device, called the MiniMed 670G, is a hybrid, closed-loop system that provides automated insulin delivery with little to no input from the user. The system includes a glucose-measuring sensor that attaches to the body, an insulin pump that straps to the body, and an infusion patch that connects to the pump with a catheter. This catheter is the way through which the insulin is delivered. Very recently, FDA expanded the approval of this device for use in younger pediatric patients, which now include children aged 7 to 13 with type 1 diabetes.

In patients with diabetes, the body’s ability to make or react to insulin is impaired, and doesn’t function correctly. The pancreas makes little or no insulin in people who have type 1 diabetes. This means that they must keep track of their glucose levels throughout the day, and inject insulin at certain points so they can avoid high glucose levels. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. recognizes the struggle for patients with type 1 diabetes, and stated, “Caregivers and families of young patients with diabetes face unique challenges in managing this disease, in particular the round-the-clock glucose monitoring that can be disruptive to people’s lives.” The MiniMed 670G helps to combat hypoglycemic episodes by measuring the glucose levels of the user every five minutes, and automatically adjusting insulin levels by either withholding insulin or administering it. While the device can adjust insulin levels automatically, users must manually request insulin to counter the consumption of carbohydrates at any mealtime.

For this approval, FDA analyzed data from clinical trials of the MiniMed 670G that spanned 105 individuals, aged 7 to 11 years of age. Each participant wore the device for just over three months, and participated in three different phases of the study so both at-home use and remote use could be monitored. At the conclusion of the study, no serious adverse events were found associated with the MiniMed 670G, and it was determined that the device was safe for use in those aged 7 to 13 with type 1 diabetes. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. states that, “Advances in science, technology and manufacturing are contributing to the development of new and expanded uses of products that can help improve the quality of life for those with chronic diseases, especially vulnerable populations, like children. Today we’re extending these opportunities to younger children who are especially vulnerable to the impact of this disease, such as the disruptions in sleep that can be caused by the need for frequent blood glucose checks. The FDA is dedicated to promoting policies that support the development of new technologies based on these advances, and to ensuring that the path to market is both efficient and effective.”

Getting treatments to pediatric populations has been an ongoing goal for both FDA and industry. Historically, medical device manufacturers and investors have been wary of expanding their products to children as the risk was seen to be too great. Nobody wants to see injured kids due to a medical technology...it's bad for business and clearly bad for the children, their families, and their healthcare providers. With this in mind, FDA has implemented policies in the past few years (e.g. sections of the 21st Century Cures Act) that helps industry help children. Getting much needed technology scaled to be appropriate for children is critical to help these populations get the treatment they need! We applaud medical device manufacturers who are (safely) working on treating these vulnerable populations.

Further Reading:

  1. FDA and Pediatrics

  2. 21st Century Cures Act: Sections that Impact FDA

  3. Press Announcement about MiniMed670G Approval