Medical Device Monday: Gore Cardioform Septal Occluder Supplement

Back in 2006, FDA approved a medical device called the GORE®CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder (Yes, Medical Device Monday typically covers new devices but just bear with us for a second). The GORE®CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder is a heart implant used to close a hole in the heart called patent foramen ovale, or PFO. Recently, the creators of GORE®CARDIOFORM applied to have a supplement to the device approved by the FDA, and we are here this week to tell you that that supplement has been approved. Before we get into what exactly the supplement is, let’s dive a little deeper into what the device does.

First off, there are two different kinds of holes you can have in your heart. One is called an atrial septal defect (ASD), and the other is a patent foramen ovale (PFO). ASD is a congenital heart defect defined by the failure of the septal tissue formation between the right atrium and the left atrium, which are the two upper chambers of the heart. While ASD can occur before birth, PFO can only occur after birth, when the foramen ovale fails to close. This naturally-occurring hole allows blood to circumvent the fetal lungs, which are non-functional until birth. When a baby is born and takes its first breath, the foramen ovale is supposed to close, and within a few months seals completely. However, should it fail to close the the patient is said to have PFO. This occurs in about 25 percent of the normal population with no adverse health effects. In fact, most people with the condition don’t even know they have it! PFO causes small amounts of blood to leak from the right side to the left side of the heart, which can create problems especially if the blood contains a blood clot that could lead to cryptogenic stroke.

To help combat this, the GORE®CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder device consists of an occluder which is implanted in the heart with the help of a delivery catheter (a small tube). The occluder is made of self-expanding Nitinol wire frame, which is covered with a thin ePTFE membrane. The ePTFE is coated with a hydrophilic substance to enable echocardiographic imaging of the occluder and surrounding heart tissue during implantation. The occluder is shaped as two discs connected in the center that makes contact with the walls on both sides of the PFO to stop the leakage of blood between the atria. The occluder can be compacted to a small size to allow it to pass through the delivery catheter to be implanted within the heart. The occluder is delivered at the PFO site using conventional catheter delivery techniques wherein the catheter is inserted through the vein to reach the heart. At the site, the occluder expands where one disc covers the right and the other disc covers the left side of the PFO. Once implanted, the occluder helps block shunting of the blood from the right to the left atrium. The supplement that has been recently approved by FDA was the expansion of the indications to include closure of the patent foramen ovale to reduce another type of stroke, recurrent ischemic stroke. Ischemic strokes occur as a result of a blockage within a blood vessel that supplies blood to the brain, and can lead to extensive brain damage.

 

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(Picture from goremedical.com)

The GORE®CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder is indicated for use in adult patients who have had a previous episode of cryptogenic stroke and are on blood-thinners (such as aspirin) to prevent another stroke. In a multinational clinical study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, there was a 77% reduction in recurrent stroke for cryptogenic stroke patients treated with the GORE CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder plus blood-thinning medication, as compared to blood-thinning medication alone. 

This is a great example of a device that is able to expand its indications after new clinical data surfaces. Congrats to Gore Medical and to those patients who avoid devastating brain damage thanks to this technology!

Click here for a video from the company website explaining the placement of the device.

 

Suggested Reading:

  1. Approval Letter

  2. Summary of safety and effectiveness

  3. Company website

  4. FDA news release